PAPAGP is the Philippine American Performing Arts

of Greater Pittsburgh

“To preserve, promote and propagate the Filipino culture

through dance, music, and other performing arts…”


Welcome to PAPAGP’S website –

the place where Philippine Folk Dance is found!

Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh added 203 new photos to the album: Performance at Quaker Valley Middle School.
PAPAGP dancers had showcased an amazing performance to support a fundraiser for Syrian children refugees.
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Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
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Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Hello everyone!

I spoke with our photographer last night. I'm meeting him up tonight to get the CDs (21 copies) and DVD (1 copy). He said he took about 400+ shots. Can't wait to see them.

I'll post them also for you to view.

Thanks!
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Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Hip hop tinikling, choreographed by Kristi Portugal, was a highlight of this year's 4th PAPAGP recital.
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Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh
Philippine-American Performing Arts of Greater Pittsburgh will present its 4th Annual Recital and Gala on Sunday, Dec. 20 at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater.
The recital—titled KASAYSAYAN, a Philippine Dance and Music Odyssey—highlights the influences of indigenous and foreign cultures on Filipino dance and music from the pre-Spanish period to modern times.
Performers will include 27 dancers aged 4-20, 13 adult dancers, and 3 guests (Santa, an elf, and guest singer Josephine Crooks). The cast will present 29 dances and 7 songs, as well as holiday music.
The 2-hour program will start at 4:30 pm and will be immediately followed by an hors d'ouvres reception. Tickets are $15. Students with ID, $10. For reservations or information, call 412-427-9235 or email agangeles@verizon.net.
*Highlights*
The first half of the program will include indigenous dances from the pre-Spanish times and dances from three centuries of Spanish rule.
From the northern Philippines, Banga-Salidsid depicts Kalinga maidens balancing heavy earthen pots (banga) on their heads. They march to the beat of wind chimes displaying stamina and strength, traits that a Kalinga man looks for in his bride. After he selects his bride, the couple perform a courtship dance.
From the south, Pangalay breathtakingly demonstrates the grace and skill of dancers balancing perilously on top of bamboo poles held on the shoulders of men. Singkil tells the story of a Princess caught in a forest during an earthquake. She and her maids dance among crisscrossed bamboo poles representing shaking trees and falling rocks until the Prince comes to her rescue.
Dances with strong Spanish influences plus traditional country dances during the Spanish times complete the first half of the program. In Sayaw sa Bangko (dance on top of a bench), couples dance on a narrow bench hopping from one end to another or from bench to bench. In Bulaklakan ("about flowers"), girls hold garlands of flowers attached to wires which arch when held overhead.
The second half of the recital will feature medleys of dances and music from the American Period to Modern Times. This half will highlight the influences of such artists as Charlie Chaplin, the Andrews Sisters, Elvis Presley, Madonna, the Black Eyed Peas and One Direction.
The most popular of Philippine dances—the bamboo pole dance Tinikling—will be performed in its traditional form, and also in a new hip-hop version.
*Featured dancers*
Siblings Kristina and Michael Pacifico will perform as Princess and Prince in the dance “Singkil.” The pair has been folk-dancing for more than 10 years. Kristina, now a sophomore at Point Park University, and Michael, a senior at Pittsburgh's City Charter High School, have rarely missed a weekend dance practice in all these years. This year, Kristina is not only a dancer but a junior instructor and choreographer as well.
Ten-year-old JP Quebral from the South Hills is one of the troupe's newest dancers. He is excited to perform for the first time on stage in “Maglalatik,” a dance portraying men with attached discarded coconut shells on their chest, back, hips, and legs, striking themselves and each other to celebrate a hard day’s work. What is remarkable about JP's joining the dance troupe is that he is allergic to almost every food, a challenging condition to endure in a group where every practice session turns into a Filipino potluck feast.
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